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RSS FeedsHe lost five family members in a Boeing 737 Max crash. Now this Toronto man is trying to stop the plane from flying again.
(The Star Theatre)

 
 

16 november 2019 17:26:04

 
He lost five family members in a Boeing 737 Max crash. Now this Toronto man is trying to stop the plane from flying again.
(The Star Theatre)
 




It is now mid-November. But for Paul Njoroge, it will always be March 10th.It was on that day his world was torn apart, his family wiped out in a single stroke, as Ethiopian Airlines Flight 302 from Addis Ababa to Nairobi plunged into a field six minutes into its flight, the impact shattering the plane and killing everyone aboard, including his three children, his wife and his mother-in-law. It was the second fatal crash of a Boeing 737 Max airliner in relatively quick succession, and the one that finally drove regulators to ground the plane worldwide, after problems with its flight control software. The quiet Toronto investment professional found himself at the centre of a media and political storm, a grieving father, husband and son-in-law to help illustrate the human toll of the disaster. Interviews followed, along with TV appearances and testimony before a U.S. congressional committee.Now, the cameras are mostly gone. But for Njoroge, the memory of the day keeps playing in his mind on an unrelenting loop. “People moved on with their lives. That’s how it is. But the people who’ve been affected primarily, that is myself and the families of the victims, our lives have never moved on. I have to be told that we’re in November. My mind is always stuck in March. My mind is always in Ethiopia,” said Njoroge during a recent conversation with the Star.When Boeing announced Nov. 11 that the 737 Max could be transporting passengers again as soon as January, he was stunned and angry.“In honour of the 346 people who died, and out of respect for the families of the victims, the jet should be scrapped. It should be taken out of the market,” said Njoroge.A congressional appearance in late October by Boeing CEO Dennis Muilenburg was nothing more than a cold, calculated public relations move to help clear the path for the 737 Max to start flying again, Njoroge believes. A claim on CNBC in early November by Boeing chair David Calhoun th ...
 
11 viewsCategory: Culture > Theatre
 
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